The Truth About Prescription Pill Addictions

prescription pill addiction

Prescription pill addiction involves more than just opioids and other pain medications. There are four broad classes of prescription pills that are commonly abused. These include opioids, benzodiazepines, sedatives, and stimulants. Although many who are prescribed prescription medications take them properly, there is still a substantial portion of the population who misuse them, resulting in addiction and the need for intensive addiction treatment. In 2017 it was estimated that more than 18 million people had misused prescription medications in the last year. While current data is not available, it is assumed based on historical statistics that this number has only continued to grow with misuse rates among adults ages 18-25 being some of the highest at nearly 15%. In these surveys, more people report using controlled prescription drugs than cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine combined putting prescription drugs just behind marijuana when it comes to illicit drug use.

Commonly Prescribed Prescription Pills

The rate of prescription drug abuse and addiction is currently considered a pandemic in the United States and only worsening with time. Unfortunately, many who end up addicted to prescription pills do so after being prescribed the drug for legitimate reasons. Also, many teens believe prescription medications to be “safer” than other drugs because a medical provider prescribes them; thus, they are more likely to misuse them. As previously noted, prescription pill addiction generally applies to four categories of drugs. 

Opioids

Opioids or prescription painkillers are used to treat severe or chronic pain conditions. They are also among the most over prescribed medication classes. Common opioids include OxyContin, Lortab, Morphine, and Percocet.

Stimulants

Adderall, a commonly prescribed stimulant, is typically prescribed to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Other medications similar to Adderall include Concerta and Ritalin.

Sedatives and Tranquilizers

Sedatives and tranquilizers are quite similar and generally produce the same intoxication effects. This category includes sleeping pills, which are classified as sedative-hypnotics. Other drugs that fall into this category are benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines or “benzos” are a form of prescription sedative. They are commonly prescribed to treat symptoms related to anxiety or to help with insomnia. The most frequently prescribed benzodiazepines are Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and Klonopin.

How Do You Get Addicted to Prescription Drugs?

Opioids, stimulants, and sedatives can be beneficial for some individuals who have been diagnosed with certain medical disorders or who struggle with chronic pain. However, many of these medications have extremely high addictive potential and, consequently, are often abused or sold illegally. But why is it that some people who take these medications develop a prescription pill addiction and others do not? For some, it may be related to genetic predisposition for addiction in general. Also, those who have a first-degree relative who suffered from a substance abuse disorder are significantly more likely to develop a substance abuse disorder than those without such a family history. Environmental factors such as peer influence and family dynamics can also play a role in prescription pill addiction.

While all of the above and other factors play a role in prescription pill addiction, one of the most common ways people get addicted to prescription drugs is through the use of the medication itself. It is not uncommon for someone who is prescribed prescription pain medication for chronic pain to take these medications for extended periods. Eventually, the initially prescribed dose is not sufficient to mitigate the pain, and higher doses are consumed to achieve the same feeling as before. This is called developing a tolerance, and it is one of the most common ways addiction develops.

Signs of a Prescription Pill Addiction

The signs and symptoms of prescription pill addiction will vary based on the specific pill being used. Some of the common behavioral signs that may indicate addiction may include doctor shopping, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, requesting refills more often than necessary, “losing” prescriptions and seeking replacements, sudden mood changes, demanding more privacy, and a host of others. Aside from the signs mentioned above and symptoms, long-term prescription pill addiction without addiction treatment can result in a host of adverse complications including overdose, incarceration, broken relationships, legal problems, failing physical health, developing a co-occurring mental health disorder, financial strain, and job loss.

Our treatment team at Soba Recovery Centers across the United States is skilled in providing individualized treatment for all types of addiction. We believe addiction treatment programs must be designed to suit each person’s needs, and therefore we focus our treatments on your needs as opposed to a standard design. If you are ready to seek treatment for a prescription pill addiction, reach out to Soba Recovery Centers today.  

Heroin Addiction: Stats & Facts

heroin addiction

Heroin is an opioid drug derived from morphine. Heroin is sometimes called by other names, including smack, hell dust, and big H. Heroin can be either a white or brown powder or a black and sticky tar-like substance known as black tar heroin. Heroin is used in a variety of ways, including injection, smoking, and snorting. In some cases, people mix heroin with crack cocaine to form an even more potent substance. This practice is called speedballing.

Since 2007, the rate of heroin use in the United States has continued to climb. According to the most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health published in 2016, the most prevalent demographic for this increase is among adults ages 18-25. In direct contrast, the rate of use among teens ages 12-17 has been declining and is currently at the lowest levels since 1991. Over the last decade, nearly one-third of all opioid-related deaths involved heroin leading to the deaths of almost 15,000 Americans in 2018-that’s approximately 130 people per day!

Death from opioid use is preventable with proper heroin addiction treatment ; however, many who need heroin addiction rehab either do not seek it or cannot get it. 

What Are the Effects of Heroin?

Heroin use has many short and long-term effects on the body and brain. Initially, heroin enters the brain and attaches to the cells responsible for feelings of pain and pleasure. It also impacts the brain’s areas responsible for essential life-sustaining functions, including heart rate, breathing, and sleeping.

In the short-term, heroin use can result in “rush” (feelings of pleasure and happiness). Despite pleasurable effects in the short-term, heroin can also result in nausea, vomiting, itching, dry mouth, and hot flashes. Long term effects of heroin include a wide range of medical difficulties, including liver and kidney disease, lung complications, mental disorders, and sexual dysfunction, among others.

How to Recognize Heroin Addiction

Heroin is highly addictive, and those who regularly use it generally develop a tolerance that requires higher and more frequent doses to get the desired effects. Those who are addicted to heroin often exhibit changes in mood and behavior. Also, there are physical signs to look for, which may indicate a heroin addiction.

Behavior Changes

Heroin addiction can result in significant changes in behavior. Individuals may distance themselves from friends, family, and other members of their social circle. Also, they may exhibit a decline in academic or professional performance. 

Physical Changes

Heroin use, whether short or long-term, can cause difficulty breathing, weight loss, and various other physical changes in the body. Heroin can also cause extended periods of drowsiness, a sudden reduction in energy, and a lack of muscle coordination.

Drug Paraphernalia and Needle Marks 

Heroin can be consumed in a variety of ways, including injection and snorting. Someone who is struggling with a heroin addiction may have visible puncture marks on their arms or other places in their bodies. As the arms have become the most common place people look, some long-term users have resorted to injecting in different places on the body, including between the toes, the thighs, or the ankles. 

Injection is the most common way of taking heroin, so someone who has syringes without a valid medical reason could potentially be using heroin or another injectable drug. For powdered heroin to be made injectable, it must be made into a liquid, so the presence of filters, a lighter or candle, and burned or charred spoons may also be indicative of a problem if they are found in conjunction with other indicators of heroin addiction. 

Heroin Addiction Treatment and Rehab

A wide range of heroin addiction treatments, including medications and behavioral therapies, have been proven effective in helping people overcome heroin addiction. For treatment to be the most successful, treatment plans must be individualized to meet each patient’s needs.  

The initial withdrawal stages from opioid addiction, including heroin addiction, can bring about intense and sometimes dangerous withdrawal symptoms. Thus, it is essential to undergo detox (sometimes also called medically assisted detox) at a heroin addiction (rehab) treatment center where trained medical professionals can closely monitor the initial stages of detox and ongoing treatment.  

Once the body has cleansed itself of heroin, it is possible to begin an intensive treatment program. Addiction treatment programs must be individually designed to achieve the best results. Through a combination of behavioral therapy, counseling, and a focus on developing new and healthy lifestyle skills, sobriety is possible. 

Beat a Heroin Addiction With Soba Recovery Center

Our renowned treatment team at Soba Recovery Center is highly trained to provide individual, one-on-one therapy designed to treat all aspects of addiction. We believe the key to addiction treatment’s success is to provide individualized care from the beginning of your journey through to sober living options we provide for our alumni. If you are ready to seek heroin addiction treatment, reach out to Soba Recovery Center today. 

Am I Addicted to Alcohol?

am i addicted to alcohol

The stereotype of someone addicted to alcohol is a person who always drinks in excess and as a result, their life is crumbling. However, the reality is some people are functioning or high-functioning alcoholics, which means even though they depend on and abuse alcohol, they have the appearance of being fine. Though you may know problem drinking as alcoholism or alcohol abuse, addiction to alcohol is officially referred to as alcohol use disorder, an addiction that is estimated to affect 15 million people in the United States. At Soba Recovery, we feel receiving treatment for alcohol use disorder is critical to success in overcoming it, but the first step toward treatment is identifying the problem.

 

Identifying an Alcohol Addiction

The signs of alcohol use disorder vary from person to person, but some common red flags in assessing whether you or a loved one has an alcohol use disorder include:

  • Needing alcohol to relax or feel confident
  • Drinking when you are alone or in secrecy
  • Feeling hungover when not drinking
  • Drinking more or longer than you intended
  • Losing friends or having relationship problems due to drinking
  • Drinking or being sick from drinking interferes with taking care of your family, working or attending school
  • Experiencing short-term memory loss or temporary blackouts
  • Feeling irritable or having extreme mood swings
  • Having legal problems related to drinking
  • Denying drinking or getting angry when confronted about drinking

If you or a loved one is exhibiting these symptoms their drinking may be cause for concern. Alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe and the urgency for treatment depends on the amount and severity of the symptoms displayed, though recovery is possible regardless of the severity.

 

How Is Alcohol Addictive?

Though alcohol is legal, it can still be a dangerous substance with serious side effects. One of these is the addictive qualities of alcohol which keeps people coming back for more and consuming it in unhealthy amounts. Alcohol is a chemical that causes our brains to release endorphins, making us feel more content and less sensitive to pain, associating these pleasurable sensations with drinking can encourage us to keep drinking even when we know it can harm us. In addition to the chemical reaction alcohol causes, we often tend to socially and in our own lives associate alcohol with positive stimuli, like having a glass of wine after a long day or getting beers with friends. When we make alcohol a reward or a treat that we use to socialize and celebrate, we create positive associations with it. Alcohol dependency doesn’t happen all at once, but rather over time as our brains are trained to crave the endorphin release of alcohol. An individual’s personality and genetics might make them predisposed to alcohol use disorder as well. Thrill seekers have a greater risk of addiction to alcohol because they seek the endorphin rush alcohol offers. Shy individuals are also prime candidates for developing alcohol use disorder because alcohol can help alleviate social anxiety and an individual can get addicted to or reliant on that effect. 

 

What Happens When You Quit Drinking Alcohol

Quitting drinking can be daunting because physical alcohol withdrawal is particularly tough on the body. However, there are many benefits of stopping drinking:

  • Improved heart and liver health
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Elevated self-esteem
  • Better sleep quality
  • Increased ability to concentrate
  • Improved focus on relationships and work
  • Lower cancer risks
  • Strengthened immune system

 

How to Get Help

If you think you are struggling with alcohol use disorder or are not sure if you have a problem or not please contact Soba Recovery today. We have professionals who can assess your situation and help determine what kind of treatment is suitable for your individual needs. Our two locations in Texas and Arizona are both amazing options for anyone struggling with alcoholism or substance abuse. 

Why Drug Rehab Aftercare Programs Are Essential to Success

drug rehab aftercare

Addiction treatment or “rehab” programs are fundamental to recovery from substance abuse. Through yours, you’ll go through detox and withdrawal, then learn important coping skills and self reflection through counseling and therapy. Chances are, you’ll leave your program feeling refreshed, healthy, and ready to start your new life in recovery.

But this is only the beginning. Addiction is viewed as an ongoing condition that can be managed, not necessarily cured. Addiction alters brain chemistry, and it often goes hand-in-hand with mental health disorders that also require lifelong care. Relapse is more common than many people realize — a study from the Journal of the American Medical Association showing that up to between 40 and 60 percent of people who have been through treatment fall back into substance abuse within a year.   

Fortunately, this doesn’t mean that failure is inevitable. Far from it. You have the power to stay in recovery and even bounce back if you do relapse. In order to maintain sobriety long-term, you will need to stay strong and keep yourself in the right place mentally. At Soba Recovery, we’re here to tell you participating in aftercare programs will play a crucial role in this. 

What Is Drug Rehab Aftercare?

Residential inpatient treatment (the most common type of rehab program) is there to help you overcome your every day urges to abuse substances and prepare you for leading a life of sobriety. However, real life is not so simple. When you leave your treatment program, you will suddenly be back in everyday life, complete with its triggers. This is why it is important to incorporate drug rehab aftercare programs into your addiction recovery. Put simply, rehab  aftercare is a personalized plan that keeps you on track long after your initial addiction treatment is over.

Think of your primary addiction treatment as a training program to help prepare you for the real world. But since the real world is filled with unpredictable challenges, ongoing support is necessary to make sure that things don’t get out of control. Addiction aftercare takes many forms, but above all it offers an outlet for the stresses of everyday life. Whether you’re participating in group or individual counseling, or even staying active in a hobby you picked up while in rehab, addiction aftercare services are crucial to keeping you on track. 

Aftercare for substance abuse also provides you with focused support that you may not be able to find elsewhere. Even the most understanding and supportive friends and family members may still not be able to understand what you are dealing with if they haven’t been there themselves. 

Aftercare for Substance Abuse Guides You to Long-Term Sobriety

With the right addiction aftercare plan in place, you will not feel like you are suddenly left all alone back in the real world. But it’s not just about coping with your life in early sobriety. While again, individual aftercare plans can (and do) vary greatly, they are there to ensure you keep on top of both your long-term and short-term goals. Many people choose to tailor their aftercare plan so it can be adjusted throughout their real-life progress. At Soba Recovery, we feel this leads to successful lifelong management of addiction and substance abuse. 

While relapse rates remain high, studies have shown aftercare for substance abuse programs to be highly effective in curbing them. One study published in the U.S. National Library of Medicine journal revealed that the likelihood of long-term abstinence rises by about 20 percent for every consecutive month individuals participate in an aftercare plan during the initial six months after they complete addiction treatment.

Forming Your Own Addiction Aftercare Plan

There are many different forms of ongoing treatment that can go into a drug rehab aftercare plan. Your own will depend on your own situation and preferences. For most people, however, aftercare plans contain a combination of the following:

  • Relapse prevention counseling
  • Mental health care (usually ongoing from initial addiction treatment)
  • Physical health care (may also include a fitness regimen plan)
  • Healthy activities / guidance on living a healthy, fulfilling life
  • Assistance finding safe housing removed from substance abuse triggers
  • Vocational counseling (help with conducting yourself professionally and finding employment)
  • Community-based support groups (like Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, etc.)

It’s worth noting that while a good addiction treatment center will help you form an aftercare plan and even provide some of the involved services, many plans include support from outside groups. This is all part of your long-term addiction recovery, allowing you to grow strong bonds with your local community and build a successful healthy life for yourself. 

We Can Help With Drug Rehab Aftercare!

At Soba Recovery, our team is here for you both through initial treatment and addiction recovery. Our full-service program will help you through detox and into sobriety, as well as offer an aftercare plan that is unique to you and your specific needs. In fact, we consider aftercare to be a vital component of the recovery process as a whole. Whether you’re still in need of initial addiction treatment or have questions about forming an aftercare plan, we’re here to help. Get in touch with us today to learn more about how you can achieve long-term sobriety and the life you deserve. 

The Benefits Of CBT For Addiction Treatment

Cognitive-behavioral therapy, also referred to as CBT,  has been used to treat substance abuse issues since the 1970s. These days, CBT is used in a variety of ways. For some patients, CBT alone is enough to treat drug dependence. For others, CBT is used alongside other types of addiction treatment such as the prescription of withdrawal medications and counseling.

CBT is talk therapy, and a combination of both behavioral and cognitive theory. The main focus with this type of treatment regime is pinpointing the behaviors and thought patterns that cause someone to struggle with drug or alcohol addiction. Addiction is the result of cyclical maladaptive thought patterns. A person struggles with addiction because they regularly return to negative, painful, and harmful thoughts. An addict will use drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism. 

During a CBT session,  a therapist works with the client to teach them new coping skills. This skill set focuses on the person’s view of the world and system of beliefs. Instead of focusing on addiction alone, this therapy focuses on the behaviors and way of thinking of the addict. 

How CBT Works

CBT treatment starts with an initial meeting. During this time, the therapist or counselor will get to know the client. They’ll have a chance to speak about their previous drug use and what their life is like. 

After the ice is broken between the therapist and client, the therapist will put together a list of target behaviors to focus on during the therapy sessions. These target behaviors are the problem behaviors that trigger drug use. The goal of CBT therapy is to help the addict avoid triggers in the future. 

Setting Goals

It’s important to set goals in therapy. Unfortunately, overcoming drug abuse takes time. Setting intermediate goals and making a schedule for anticipated accomplishments is a good way to stay motivated throughout treatment.

During CBT treatment, the therapist and client will set out specific goals that address behavioral problems that need to be corrected.

Preventing Triggers

One major focus of CBT treatment is identifying triggers that lead to drug use. After triggers have been identified, the therapist and client draw out a plan. This is a plan that will prevent exposure to triggers. This could include no longer frequenting certain locations or people that make relapse more likely. Preventing triggers could also involve obtaining control over thinking patterns that push the client to use drugs.

Analyzing Thought Patterns

One thing clients are often asked to do when undergoing CBT treatment is keep a record of their thoughts. This record helps to pinpoint the negative thoughts that are the most damaging and most likely to result in drug use. Part of this step in CBT treatment is disproving negative thoughts. Problematic thoughts are rationally analyzed to show that they are counter-productive. The therapist and the client make a list of evidence that shows how and why these thoughts should be corrected.

Creating A Healthy Schedule

Planning for CBT treatment isn’t just about avoiding drug abuse triggers. It’s more holistic than that. Part of CBT treatment  includes developing a schedule of healthy activities. Improving overall health can improve the clients general mood and strengthen the client’s will power to avoid relapse.

Benefits Of CBT 

CBT treatment is beneficial because it addresses the fact that substance abuse is typically the result of repeated thought patterns and behaviors. CBT treatment helps addicts manage their compulsion to consume drugs by identifying and avoiding the scenarios that bring rise to this compulsion.

We’re Here To Help

If you or a loved one are looking for the right substance abuse treatment, consider our CBT offerings at Soba Recovery Centers. We have locations in Arizona and Texas, and we specialize in detoxification, residential inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, and aftercare options. Reach out to us today to learn more

Cocaine Addiction: How To Get Help

Cocaine abuse is, unfortunately, an all too common problem in the United States. In fact, over 900,000 Americans met the criteria indicating cocaine addiction as of 2014. Being addicted to cocaine can have negative consequences for an individual’s health and personal and professional lives.

Fortunately, addiction treatment for people who have become dependent on cocaine consumption offers success. If you or a loved one is addicted to cocaine and looking to stop using, don’t wait to reach out to get help. At Soba Recovery, we’re waiting for your call. 

Cocaine and Its Effects on the Body

Cocaine is a drug that stimulates the nervous system. It can be consumed in a variety of ways. The most common way to consume cocaine is through snorting this drug in powder form. However, cocaine can also be smoked or injected. 

When cocaine is ingested, it produces a euphoric effect. It can also create sensations in users of being highly energetic. The effects that cocaine consumption offers can result in both physical and psychological addictions. Physically, the body can become dependent on the drug so that withdrawal symptoms such as fatigue, depression, and irritability are noticed when affected individuals no longer consume cocaine. Psychologically, chronic cocaine users can become dependent on the drug and experience thoughts and feelings of needing it to get through the day. 

Perhaps the biggest reason why it’s so easy to become addicted to cocaine is because cocaine use produces high dopamine levels in the brain. This means that cocaine use creates a strong and intense reward response in the brain. Regular cocaine users enjoy this response and their brains are reprogrammed by routine cocaine consumption. If they don’t continue to use cocaine, their dopamine levels can drop abnormally low so that they feel very depressed and desperate to use cocaine again. 

Symptoms of Cocaine Addiction

If you’re suffering from a cocaine addiction, you probably feel like you’re unable to keep up with personal, professional, and financial commitments. You may also notice your addiction is starting to affect your health. Lack of appetite, unintentional weight loss, feeling paranoid, and feeling depressed, are all negative side effects to cocaine use. If you notice these symptoms in someone else, they may need help with their addiction as well. 

Seeking Treatment for Cocaine Addiction

Addiction to cocaine can be treated in a variety of ways. At Soba Recovery, we know overcoming addiction is not always easy. We do everything we can to make you feel as safe and comfortable as possible. We offer numerous treatment options that can help you overcome your cocaine addiction.

The first step to the recovery process is detoxification. Detoxification is an essential part of overcoming cocaine addiction or any other type of drug addiction. Detoxification is the process of ridding your body of cocaine and any other harmful substances. It’s also the first step to recovery One of the most difficult parts of detoxification is dealing with withdrawal symptoms. While withdrawal symptoms can be difficult to handle, we at Soba Recovery make sure we’re doing everything we can to ease the withdrawals. We also monitor your vitals 24/7 to make sure no health complications arise during detox. 

After detox, there are a few different treatment options for you. We usually recommend clients complete residential inpatient treatment, then partial hospitalization, outpatient, and sober living. We know addiction and treatment is different for everyone so if the above mentioned isn’t your path, that’s ok. We know some people aren’t able to complete residential treatment because they have personal obligations at home. Below is a breakdown of each treatment option: 

Residential Inpatient 

Residential inpatient treatment is typically the next best step to take in recovery after detoxification. On average your stay with us will be about one month. During this time you’ll live at our treatment facility and have round the clock care. You’ll eat your meals here, attend group, and individual therapy. Residential inpatient care is an excellent way to detox and overcome withdrawal symptoms with the assistance of doctors and counselors who have a great deal of experience regarding the treatment of drug addiction. This is the time where you’ll also start to dig deep and find out the root cause of your cocaine addiction.

Partial Hospitalization

Partial hospitalization can be used as a step down from residential inpatient treatment or in lieu of. The program is similar to residential inpatient but you don’t sleep at our facility. You spend the day attending different therapy sessions and connecting with others around you, but get to go home to your own bed at night. You’ll also focus on finding out some triggers for your addiction. 

Outpatient and Sober Living

Outpatient treatment continues the therapies offered during inpatient and partial hospitalization. Alot of our clients will attend outpatient while in a sober living home. These treatment options give you the flexibility in your schedule to get a job and start to get back to “normal” life while still working on your recovery. Outpatient and sober living are both great tools when preventing relapse. 

Get Help for Cocaine Addiction Today 

The sooner you or your loved one seeks help for cocaine addiction, the sooner this severe problem can be overcome. The first step to getting the treatment you or your loved one needs for cocaine addiction is to contact us at SOBA Recovery Center. We’ll provide you with more information and answer your questions regarding treatment options.

At Soba Recovery Centers, we’re here to help. We offer treatment programs for cocaine addiction in Mesa, Arizona and San Antonio, Texas. Contact us to learn more about our cocaine addiction treatment centers and the drug addiction treatments we provide.

Beating the Addiction: Opioids

The United States is currently experiencing a devastating opioid epidemic. 128 people die every day from an opioid overdose.  Opioids are one of the most common prescription medications used today and also happen to be the most dangerous. Opioids are meant to be used on a short-term basis to help people control pain. They are extremely addictive and it’s common that someone ends up using them for years. 

What is an Opioid Addiction?

Opioid addiction is a long-lasting disease that causes health, social, and economic problems. It’s characterized by a compulsive urge to use opioid drugs, even when they are no longer needed for medical purposes. The addiction happens when the brain chemistry is changed by repeat drug use, and a tolerance is built. Physical and emotional withdrawals will then occur if the person addicted stops taking opioids. Millions of Americans are impacted by opioid addiction every day. 

Commonly prescribed opioids are hydrocodone, morphine, codeine, and fentanyl. Heroin is also an opioid but isn’t prescribed by doctors. Heroin is sold and purchased on the streets. It’s not uncommon for someone to start using hydrocodone and eventually use heroin. 

How to Break an Opioid Addiction

Breaking an opioid addiction may seem extremely difficult but it doesn’t have to be. While there are numerous people addicted to opioids, there are also numerous people who are successful in recovery from opioids. Below are a few tips on how to break an opioid addiction: 

  1. Admit You Need Help: The first step in beating an opioid addiction, just like any other addiction, is admitting you need help. Addiction isn’t a matter of ‘self-control’, it’s a disease that affects and rewires the brain. It’s completely ok to admit to yourself and others that you do in fact need help and want to get sober. Don’t be ashamed, asking for help doesn’t mean you’re weak, it actually means you’re strong. 
  2. Know Your Options: After admitting you need help, the next step in the right direction is to research treatment options. There are what seems to be an endless amount of treatment options available. It’s helpful to do some research and get informed on the many kinds of treatment available to beat opioids. Beating addiction shouldn’t be done alone and is most effectively done with the help of a treatment center.
  3. Reach Out: It’s important to contact treatment centers and facilities to get more information on their programs once you do some research. It may be helpful to write down the questions you have before calling. Speaking to someone over the phone and asking questions that are important should make you feel more comfortable about pursuing recovery. 
  4. Trust the Professionals: Finally, people who are looking for help with an opioid addiction need to trust trained medical professionals. These are specialists who have the expertise necessary to get to the root of someone’s opioid addiction. They do what they do because they want to help you and see you live a successful, drug-free life. They help you uncover the root of your drug addiction so you can become happy and sober. 

We’re Here to Help

At Soba Recovery, we are honored to be one of the main drug & alcohol treatment programs serving individuals and families in the southwest region. We have programs both in Mesa, AZ and San Antonio, TX. Our detox & inpatient treatment programs help participants battle addiction and take steps to recovery. Our unique luxury addiction treatment program takes advantage of proven, traditional treatment methods and blends them with new, innovative therapies. Our priority is helping our clients overcome substance abuse and retain sobriety. If you would like to find out more about our addiction treatment program, please contact us!