Beating the Addiction: Opioids

The United States is currently experiencing a devastating opioid epidemic. 128 people die every day from an opioid overdose.  Opioids are one of the most common prescription medications used today and also happen to be the most dangerous. Opioids are meant to be used on a short-term basis to help people control pain. They are extremely addictive and it’s common that someone ends up using them for years. 

What is an Opioid Addiction?

Opioid addiction is a long-lasting disease that causes health, social, and economic problems. It’s characterized by a compulsive urge to use opioid drugs, even when they are no longer needed for medical purposes. The addiction happens when the brain chemistry is changed by repeat drug use, and a tolerance is built. Physical and emotional withdrawals will then occur if the person addicted stops taking opioids. Millions of Americans are impacted by opioid addiction every day. 

Commonly prescribed opioids are hydrocodone, morphine, codeine, and fentanyl. Heroin is also an opioid but isn’t prescribed by doctors. Heroin is sold and purchased on the streets. It’s not uncommon for someone to start using hydrocodone and eventually use heroin. 

How to Break an Opioid Addiction

Breaking an opioid addiction may seem extremely difficult but it doesn’t have to be. While there are numerous people addicted to opioids, there are also numerous people who are successful in recovery from opioids. Below are a few tips on how to break an opioid addiction: 

  1. Admit You Need Help: The first step in beating an opioid addiction, just like any other addiction, is admitting you need help. Addiction isn’t a matter of ‘self-control’, it’s a disease that affects and rewires the brain. It’s completely ok to admit to yourself and others that you do in fact need help and want to get sober. Don’t be ashamed, asking for help doesn’t mean you’re weak, it actually means you’re strong. 
  2. Know Your Options: After admitting you need help, the next step in the right direction is to research treatment options. There are what seems to be an endless amount of treatment options available. It’s helpful to do some research and get informed on the many kinds of treatment available to beat opioids. Beating addiction shouldn’t be done alone and is most effectively done with the help of a treatment center.
  3. Reach Out: It’s important to contact treatment centers and facilities to get more information on their programs once you do some research. It may be helpful to write down the questions you have before calling. Speaking to someone over the phone and asking questions that are important should make you feel more comfortable about pursuing recovery. 
  4. Trust the Professionals: Finally, people who are looking for help with an opioid addiction need to trust trained medical professionals. These are specialists who have the expertise necessary to get to the root of someone’s opioid addiction. They do what they do because they want to help you and see you live a successful, drug-free life. They help you uncover the root of your drug addiction so you can become happy and sober. 

We’re Here to Help

At Soba Recovery, we are honored to be one of the main drug & alcohol treatment programs serving individuals and families in the southwest region. We have programs both in Mesa, AZ and San Antonio, TX. Our detox & inpatient treatment programs help participants battle addiction and take steps to recovery. Our unique luxury addiction treatment program takes advantage of proven, traditional treatment methods and blends them with new, innovative therapies. Our priority is helping our clients overcome substance abuse and retain sobriety. If you would like to find out more about our addiction treatment program, please contact us!

How To Quit Using Benzos

Addiction is a serious disease that doesn’t differentiate based on race, gender, or background. It comes in many forms and can impact anyone at any time. There are a few drugs that are particularly addictive, such as benzodiazepines, which are also known as benzos. If you or someone you know is suffering from a benzo addiction, please seek professional help. Benzos can change one’s life drastically and are extremely addictive. Benzo abuse can also be detrimental to one’s health and is very dangerous

What are Benzodiazepines?

Benzodiazepines, also known as benzos, are a common class of prescription medication that is used to treat a variety of medical conditions. Some of the most common forms of benzos are diazepam, lorazepam, Klonopin, and Xanax. Benzos have two major medical applications. First, benzos are used to stop someone who is having seizures. A seizure takes place when the neurons in the brain start to fire out of control. There are different kinds of seizures such as tonic-clonic, grand mal, and absence seizure.

The other major application of benzos comes in the form of anxiety management. If someone is having a panic attack, benzos such as the commonly prescribed Xanax, stop the panic attack from continues. This medicine is short-acting and can stop a panic attack in its tracks; however, this medication is also incredibly addictive. Benzos are supposed to be prescribed as an emergency use only pill, but people prescribed can end up taking them every day.  The longer someone abuses benzos, the more likely they’ll become addicted. It’s really not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. There are certain signs and symptoms one can look out for when it comes to an addiction to benzos.

What are the Signs & Symptoms?

If someone develops an addiction to benzos, there are a few signs and symptoms that people might note. First, someone who suffers from an addiction to benzos will end up going to the doctor more often than usual. This takes place because someone is going to need a prescription to pick up benzos. Then, that individual might end up going through prescriptions of benzos faster than they should. 

As the addiction worsens, individuals are going to develop mood swings, become increasingly lethargic, and experience slurred speech. They will do anything they can to feed that addiction. When the doctor stops writing prescriptions, someone who suffers from an addiction is going to turn to buying them off the streets. This can directly impact someone’s financial situation as they’re paying out of pocket for the drugs versus using insurance. 

How to Quit

The safest and most effective way to quit using benzos is to seek help from a trained medical professional. Stopping cold turkey is extremely dangerous and can cause health complications, such as seizures. If someone is addicted to their prescription, they can go to the doctor prescribing the medicine and asked to be tapered off. Being “tapered off” means the doctor will determine a smaller dose to give the person, then a smaller dose after that, to gradually get this person off the drug. 

If someone is addicted to benzos that they’re buying off the street, they can also go to a doctor and seek help or they can go to a drug rehab for detox. During detox, the person will also be tapered off the drug, under medical supervision 24 hours a day. Detox at a rehab isn’t only for people who are purchasing benzos illegally, it is for anyone who is addicted regardless of if they have a prescription or not. 

Completing detox at a rehab then attending an inpatient rehab is one of the best ways to ensure someone will get sober and stay sober. During treatment, the addict learns the coping skills needed to stay sober and also gains a support group. Having the support of friends and family is important when getting sober, but having a sober community is even more important for beating a benzo addiction.

Let Us Help!

At Soba Recovery, we offer detox and inpatient treatment programs at both of our Soba Texas and Soba Mesa rehab centers that help people overcome addiction. We provide a unique luxury program that combines traditional addiction treatment with modern therapies to assist clients in overcoming substance abuse for good. If you are interested in learning more about how our program can help you overcome the chains of addiction, contact us today!

Opioid Withdrawal Timeline

There are a number of significant challenges someone has to face when trying to overcome substance abuse. One of the most intimidating topics to discuss is withdrawals. The symptoms can vary from being mild to severe and are different for everyone. Withdrawal symptoms also depend on the substance someone is abusing.

Withdrawal typically takes place during detox (the first few days of the recovery period). The good news is medical detox helps make withdrawal as comfortable as possible for drug and alcohol users. At Soba Recovery we provide a comprehensive detox program to help our clients overcome substance abuse, making recovery within your reach.

What are Withdrawals?

When someone is addicted to drugs or alcohol, the body has been conditioned to believe it needs those substances to survive. As those substances and toxins start to leave the body, people will start to experience cravings. This is the driving force that has powered their addictions from day one. When the body doesn’t get these substances quickly it will enter withdrawal.

Some withdrawals can cause health complications or lead to relapse. For this reason, it’s important to lean on trained professionals who provide around-the-clock care. You don’t have to go through this alone. Withdrawal can be one of the most challenging phases of recovery but once you overcome withdrawal you can overcome anything.

What do Opioid Withdrawals Look Like?

Withdrawal is going to take many shapes and forms and depends on the substance someone is addicted to. For example, someone who is going through withdrawal from benzodiazepines may develop seizures. Withdrawal from alcohol may take a course known as delirium tremens, often shortened to DTs. There are a few common symptoms opioid users experience during withdrawal.

One of the first symptoms is opioid cravings. Someone may feel a powerful drive to use drugs once again. This can evoke an emotional reaction. Muscle aches are soon to follow as well as body pain. Lack of sleep is also common as cravings can keep someone up at night. Eventually, individuals develop agitation and anxiety. One of the most common comparisons for opioid withdrawals is they are like having the flu.

How Long Does Opioid Withdrawal Last?

Withdrawal symptoms can start as soon as six hours after the last dose of drugs. Some people even notice symptoms as quickly as two hours after the last dose. If the addiction is a longer-acting opioid medication, the symptoms may be delayed for up to a day.

Within 72 hours, the symptoms should peak. This peak might be delayed if someone is using a longer-acting opioid. Then, over the next few days, the symptoms are going to subside gradually. Again, if the opioid is longer-acting, this process may be a little longer. Withdrawal periods vary from person to person but on average last around five days.

Get Help

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) published between 26.4 million and 36 million people around the globe abuse opiate drugs, which includes prescription pain relievers and the illegal drug heroin. Know that you’re not alone battling this addiction. Soba Mesa offers medically assisted detox and our clients are monitored 24 hours per day. Our medical practitioners prescribe the correct medicine to alleviate the discomfort associated with the withdrawal symptoms mentioned above. Contact us to get help. We would be honored to assist you with addiction treatment.

Drug Addiction and Depression: How They Intertwine

woman struggling with depression and drug addiction

Drug Addiction and Depression

Did you know that approximately 20 million Americans have drug addictions that are not being treated? This often leads to their condition getting worse and sometimes lethal. Drug addiction and depression are popular patterns that go hand in hand; where the person will have psychological disorders, as they age the condition of their mental state sharply declines. In a lot of cases, they will develop substance abuse or alcohol abuse issues. Studies show that women were more likely to be diagnosed with mental illness than men. Substance abuse among women is growing at an alarming rate where a 2009 survey reported that women 6.6% of women aged 12 and older had confessed to using an illegal drug.

The Catastrophic Effects of Alcohol, Depression & Substance Abuse

Many people who are alcoholics and heavy drinkers are in danger of liver cirrhosis which is when the liver does not perform properly due to excessive and long term abuse. Cirrhosis can eventually lead to the liver failing completely which ultimately can lead to death.

Depression and substance abuse come with their myriad of negative effects as well. Depression not only weakens your immune system leaving you susceptible to colds and viruses but can cause insomnia, difficulty focusing which is especially problematic in academic environments, inability to preserve healthy personal relationships, and in some occasion’s chronic pain!

Substance abuse is even worse with the effect varying on the substance.

Inside the Psychology of Depression, Alcoholism, & Drug Addiction

couple trying to cope with depressionThe reason why many people with depression turn to opioid substances is because of the chemical Dopamine that is released when the drugs are taken. Dopamine affects our emotions, movement, and recollection and since the brain remembers the feeling of being “high” an increased level of pleasure is released which in turn becomes addictive due to the brain craving the activity.

When someone is depressed and cuts themselves, several people have reported that the motor response that is released is similar to shooting heroin. It is also reported that this behavior is self-reinforcing and gives the user a sense of power and a sense of control.

Now alcohol, on the other hand, is slightly different as alcohol for many is solving a problem. The underlying primary problem for alcohol abuse could have started in your adolescence, teen years or your adulthood. From those times onward there will be some bad feelings, bad relationships and bad situations that were experienced which leads to alcohol becoming the coping mechanism and, thus the cycle begins.

Other cases that have led to alcoholism are peer pressure and the want for social acceptance. In a lot of social situations, many may find it hard to turn down their friends who are offering them drink after drink. It is human nature to want to be accepted by our peers and loved ones, many would say that it is fundamental to humans. Getting rejected is actually not good for your health; some symptoms from rejection are not sleeping well, weakened immune system, depression, and a shortened life span. All of these side effects can lead to peer pressure drinking.

Warning Signs of Substance Abuse and Depression

Here are some warning signs and symptoms of depression and drug use that you want to pay attention to. If you see your loved one doing these consistently then they may need treatment.

  • Loss of appetite or constant binge eating
  • Shying away from their usual activities and behaviors
  • Sleeping a lot and lacking energy
  • Loss of hope, feeling numb and feeling like nothing matters
  • Drinking, smoking and abusing more drugs than they were before
  • Feeling unusually moody usually angry, sad, worried, on edge, or fearful
  • Hostility and fighting between their close family and friends
  • Hearing thoughts and believing things/events that are not true
  • Thoughts of self-harm
  • Lack of motivation to do daily necessary tasks (example: bathing)

Depression and Addiction Recovery

In addition to receiving addiction treatment, some methods that may help improve the mental state of those with depression and substance abuse disorders are:

  • Reaching out and connecting with others in the church, participating in community services, and engaging with positive influences in their lives
  • Utilizing healthy outlets such as painting, drawing, singing, exercising, cooking, writing
  • Helping to improve others’ lives
  • Receiving professional help through a rehab service

In order to solve the issue of the person’s attachment to the substance, you have to find out what led to the substance abuse and the underlying reason why the user is abusing alcohol or other substances. After the root cause is discovered the next step is to find a healthier replacement so that the user can gradually and safely let go of the substance/substances.

When the right issue is addressed we can begin to reach a solution so that many more people will have a better quality of life and healthy lifestyles not dependent on substances.

8 Signs Someone You Love May be Using Drugs

Drug addiction doesn’t happen overnight. It generally starts with occasional, recreational use and gradually with repeated use; it progresses into the need for regular use regardless of the risk to your relationships, your health, your career, and your finances. Addiction is the psychological and physical need to continue use, regardless of the effects. The amount of time it takes before substance abuse takes hold on someone’s life varies from person to person, but eventually, the individual feels compelled to seek out their substance of choice due to strong cravings. It’s important to keep in mind that most people with a substance abuse problem tend to keep their addiction a secret and it’s unlikely that they admit to the problem. Learning the signs that someone you care about is abusing drugs and/or alcohol may be the difference between life and death. Here are 8 signs that someone you care about may be using drugs.

1. Physical Changes in Appearance

Changes in appearance are the most common sign of drug abuse. Some of the most common changes in appearance may include:

  • Weight loss or gain
  • Pale skin
  • Changes in dental health
  • Hair loss
  • Fatigue

Keep in mind that these changes may be gradual, but in many situations, the changes are relatively sudden and often times very drastic. The person may also have bloodshot or glassy eyes, their pupils may constrict or dilate, they may have a constantly runny nose, and/or they may have sores on their skin, which are often caused by scratching, injections, and/or picking at the skin.

2. Personal Hygiene

It’s also common for someone with a substance abuse problem to have a decline in their personal hygiene. If the person appears unkempt, such as not showering, brushing their teeth, and wearing the same clothes daily, they may have a substance abuse problem and should start addiction treatment as soon as possible.

3. Missed Work or School

Although people who have a substance abuse problem do their best to manage their everyday life, unfortunately, their addiction generally wins in the end. They often miss a lot of work or school, which is often the result of all-night binges or simply losing interest in anything but their substance of choice. Substance abuse changes the way people look at their responsibilities. Their priorities shift and typically in ways that aren’t admirable. For instance, someone that is typically dependable will begin to forget appointments, miss deadlines, and be just generally unreliable.

4. Money Problems

An addiction is an expensive habit, one that can cost hundreds, even thousands of dollars weekly in order to maintain daily use of substance supply. Individuals with a drug abuse problem often spend large, unexplained amounts of money, drain their bank account, and go outside their budget in order to supply their habit. Unfortunately, once they have depleted their personal finances, people with a substance abuse problem often turn to steal money and/or items that can be sold. If the person is constantly in need of financial assistance because they “lost” their money or their money is “missing”, it may be a sign of drug abuse. It is important to not enable the person by giving them money to buy their drugs. It is essential that you stand your ground, even if they become angry or try to put pressure on you – enabling does not help them.

5. Poor Judgment

Individuals that have a drug abuse problem will usually do anything to obtain their substance of choice, including participating in risky, dangerous behaviors, such as lying, stealing, selling drugs, and engaging in unsafe sexual activity. These behaviors often result in the individual being arrested and spending time in jail; however, this generally doesn’t deter them and once they are released from jail, they will continue participating in these risky behaviors.

6. Unhealthy Friendships

Changes in friendship may not be uncommon, but some changes may be drastic. For instance, a newly abandoned longtime friend will have no idea why the person stopped being friends with them. People with a drug abuse problem may change friends by simply changing the crowd they hang out with; this is because they want to spend time with others who have similar habits.

7. Change in Behavior

One of the most common signs of a substance abuse problem is that the person becomes defensive, secretive, and isolated. They tend to refuse to answer questions with a straight answer. For instance, when asked where they have been, the answer is typically something like “why do you care” or it may be as simple as “out”.  Their mood is generally unpredictable and may include sudden outbursts, acting erratically, and may shift suddenly from positive to negative.

8. Denial

Someone with a drug abuse problem will not only deny they have a problem, but they will deny anything and everything they are confronted with. In many situations, the denial isn’t only for your benefit, but for theirs as well. It’s typically difficult for someone with a drug abuse problem to admit they need addiction treatment and it’s because they really do not think they have a problem. Many people with an addiction will not reach out for help or quit using drugs/alcohol on their own.

It’s important to remember that addiction is a disease that affects everyone. The individual with the addiction is affected physically, psychologically, and emotionally as are their family and friends. People with an addiction problem often need loved ones to step in and help them get the help they need, so by knowing the signs of addiction, you can address the situation as early as possible and encourage them to get the life-saving help they need.

If you are concerned that someone you care about may have a substance abuse problem, contact Soba recovery for information about how we can help.

Top Ten Ways to Kick Cocaine

Kicking the cocaine habit is difficult due to the mental and physical effects it has on the body. You need both medical and psychological help to get you through the withdrawal effects of this drug. When it comes to quitting, though, you are not alone. Evaluate these ten ways to see which can help you the most to kick coke to the curb. You may need to try several to get over your addiction.

1. Stopping Cold Turkey or Detoxing

Generally, stopping cold turkey is the least preferable way to quit cocaine because doing so can cause serious side effects. These side effects can include severe drowsiness, agitation, suicidal thoughts, anxiety, depression, and paranoia. The mental effects of stopping coke may be serious enough to require a doctor’s intervention to keep you from hurting yourself.

If you want to stop cold turkey, consider checking yourself into a medically supervised detox facility. The doctors and nurses on hand will ensure that you get the support you need as your body goes through withdrawal.

3. Social Support Groups

While you go through withdrawal, you will need help to work through the emotions that emerge during quitting. Talking about your feelings and experiences with others who are going through the same steps may help you to power through the withdrawal stages and after.

3. Find Replacements for Cocaine

Because substance abuse no longer holds your life hostage, you will have more time on your hands. Unless you find something to fill that time with, you may go back to using drugs. Take the time during recovery to try out new hobbies, such as playing an instrument, knitting, or volunteering. Working with your hands can distract you when you experience cravings.

4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psychological technique that helps patients to change how they respond to specific situations. For addiction treatment, if you used cocaine in certain situations, by going through CBT, you will learn to do other things than turn to drugs. If you choose a formal counseling program or therapist, most use this therapeutic technique. Even 12-step programs integrate elements of CBT into their methods.

5. Motivational Incentives

For some people, motivation helps. Create rewards for yourself that correspond to times without coke. For example, you may use the money saved on drugs to buy yourself a new video game or jacket if you go for a week without using drugs. You may also increase the incentives to encourage yourself to extend the length of time you go cocaine-free. Perhaps you invest in the down payment for a new car after lasting a year of living cleanly.

6. Balance Your Life

Your life will get turned upside down when you stop using cocaine. The parties you once went to will no longer be options for you because you may feel too tempted to use drugs again. Part of getting over substance abuse is discovering how to keep yourself balanced.

Get regular exercise, develop good sleep habits, and eat a healthy diet. These activities will keep your body and mind healthy. They will also replace some of the time you once devoted in your schedule to drug use. If you used coke to improve your mood or energy levels, healthier living will replace it to give you more energy.

7. Unfriend Some People

Carefully examine your life, and if you have friends who encouraged you in your addiction, break ties with them. People who push you toward self-destructive behaviors, like substance abuse, are not friends.

To keep yourself from feeling lonely, look for activities in your area that do not require drugs where you can make friends. Sign up for a softball league, visit a house of worship, or volunteer your time. Making friends outside drug-use activities can make quitting easier.

8. Identify and Eliminate Triggers

Triggering events, feelings, locations, and people can be difficult to avoid, especially if you retain your old routine while trying to quit. You need to assess your life and identify times when you would use coke. If you only used it as a party drug, you should avoid going to parties for a while. For some people, the trigger may have been stress in their life. Getting more exercise or meditation to reduce stress can help remove that trigger. Talk to your therapist about possible triggers and how you can get those out of your life.

9. Check Into an Intensive Treatment Facility

If you have a serious addiction, check yourself into a substance abuse treatment facility. Though in 2013, only 6% of people in rehab centers had a cocaine addiction, 68% of those use more than one drug.

The advantage of professional treatment facilities is the access you have to a variety of services, such as CBT, intensive individual therapy, family therapy, psychodynamic group therapy, and more. At addiction recovery facilities, you can detox from coke, begin therapy, and discover ways to stay drug-free for life.

10.  Keep Trying

Unfortunately, those who recover from reliance on coke may experience a relapse. In fact, between 40% and 60% of those who recover once will relapse. Don’t let this discourage you because it reflects the recurrence rate of serious medical issues like asthma or high blood pressure, which can have a recurrence of 50% to 70%.

Get the professional addiction treatment you need to recover from your problem in a relaxing, luxurious setting. Contact us at SOBA Recovery today for more information on our cocaine and other substance addiction recovery programs.

The Top Five Thoughts to Have Before Using Opioids

Addiction is a serious issue that impacts countless individuals and families across the country. Fortunately, the attitude towards addiction and mental health issues is starting to see a shift. This has allowed countless people who are impacted by addiction to seek the help that they deserve. Once someone is able to achieve sobriety, this is an occasion that deserves to be celebrated. When it comes to an addiction to opioids, this is an impressive achievement. Sadly, a large percentage of people who achieve sobriety are going to suffer a relapse. The relapse rate during recovery may be as high as 60 percent. Before someone makes the decision to use opioids, there are a few thoughts that need to enter the head.

1. Why Do I Feel to Urge to Revert to Substance Abuse?

First, people need to ask why they are feeling the urge to use opioids once again. While a relapse after a period of sobriety is not uncommon, it is also important for people to know why they are doing this. During the road to recovery, one of the goals is to address the root cause of the reasons why someone decided to use opioids in the first place. Have these causes changed? Are the roots the same?  Figuring out why someone is feeling the urge to use opioids again is an important part of avoiding a relapse. Even though relapse can impact more than half of all individuals in recovery, there are still steps people should take to stay sober.

2. What Was My Top Priority During Addiction Treatment?

Next, people need to ask themselves whether or not sobriety is really their top priority. Sure, there are lots of pulls on people’s time. This includes personal relationships, professional relationships, job obligations, and personal hobbies. On the other hand, unless someone gets clean for themselves, they are not going to be able to stay sober. Without a complete and total dedication to long-term sobriety, relapse is going to happen. This means that people need to be willing to put in the hard work. Is the hard work getting done? Are meetings being attended? Are sponsors being called? Or are counseling sessions being capped? This can help people stay sober and avoid relapse.

3. Where Is My Addiction Treatment Support System?

In addition, everyone needs to ask whether or not they have a strong support system. Addiction is a disease. It should be treated as such. At the same time, addiction can be beaten. In order for someone to overcome addiction and stay sober, a strong support system must be in place. Someone who has newly achieved sobriety needs to rely on the support network from day one. This can make a difference in helping someone stay sober or relapsing back into the claws and reaches of addiction. Anyone who is thinking about using opioids needs to reach out to the support system. This might include friends, family members, spiritual leaders, and support groups.

4. Why Did I Make the Decision to Quit Substance Abuse?

Next, people need to make sure that they are quitting for the right reasons. As mentioned above, everyone needs to make the decision to quit for themselves and their long-term well-being. Anyone who enters into treatment in order to make friends or family members happy is bound to fail. If they aren’t committed to themselves, they are not going to be able to commit to treatment. This is one of the biggest reasons why people think about using opioids again. Everyone needs to make sure they are quitting for the right reasons. This can have a long-term impact on someone’s overall health, well-being, and future desires. Remember, before making the decision to use again, the impact this is going to have on one’s own life.

5. Am I Ready?

Finally, before making the decision to use opioids, people need to think about all of the work they have done to get to this point. When someone achieves sobriety, they had put in a tremendous amount of work in order to get clean. All of this work has been done to rebuild a regular life and avoid a relapse. Is it really OK to destroy all of this work at the altar of opioids? Is it really OK to return to the world of social isolation and damaged personal relationships? Remember to think about this before making the decision to use opioids again.

Rely on the Professionals at Soba Recovery

At Soba Recovery, we are dedicated to helping everyone find the drug and alcohol addiction treatment they need. With locations in Mesa, AZ, and San Antonio, TX we provide detox and inpatient treatment for numerous types of addiction. If you would like to learn more about our services, please call us today to learn more!

The Top Five Signs of Drug Addiction

Drug abuse and addiction are among the most significant problems facing the modern healthcare system today. Those who have watched a loved one struggle with drug addiction know just how quickly this problem can tear someone’s life apart. On the other hand, the problems related to drug abuse and addiction tend to start slowly and insidiously. They are typically easy to overlook. It might start with someone who struggles to battle a simple injury and illness. Then, it balloons into a tremendous problem that can take someone’s entire life down with them, impacting family members and friends along the way.

Therefore, it is critical for everyone to know about the common signs that indicate drug abuse is a serious issue. Knowing these signs ahead of time will help everyone get the help they need as early as possible.

1. The Cravings and Relapses are Real

One of the most significant signs of serious drug abuse is the development of cravings that will lead to a relapse. For example, anxiety and depression are common side effects that come with cravings for an addictive substance. Difficulty concentrating is another common sign. At first, people will promise to give up drugs and say they can do it on their own. Then, when the going gets tough, the cravings start and these symptoms start to set in. That is when the drug use is going to abandon all promises and go off in search of drugs again. Even though someone might say that he or she can quit anytime, this simply isn’t the case. He or she will need help to quit for good.

2. Tolerance Begins to Develop

Another common sign of drug abuse and addiction is the development of something called tolerance. This is the term used to describe the body getting used to having drugs in its system. At first, someone might not need a lot of the substance to achieve the intended effect. People can get high with a relatively small amount.

Then, as someone uses drugs more and more often, they are going to need more drugs to achieve the same effect. This is because the body is getting used to the substance and is developing something called tolerance.

When someone needs more of the drug, this is going to lead to bigger changes in someone’s life. This is going to impact that person’s appearance, eating habits, finances, and more.

3. The Lifestyle Begins to Change

As tolerance sets in, someone’s lifestyle is going to change. This is going to lead to risky behavior. This is because the person is going to place anything and everything else second to drug use. They might even engage in activities that they wouldn’t otherwise. This is going to include activities such as using drug paraphernalia, stealing from others, sharing needles with people, and more. This is going to impact both personal and professional relationships. Their physical health is going to be in jeopardy. This is where others are going to have to step in and help their family member or friend.

4. Motivation is Going to be Impacted

Gradually, someone who is addicted to drugs is going to start to ignore life’s other responsibilities. This might mean dropping out of school. This could mean ignoring work responsibilities. Motivation is going to be at a minimum and is going to strain relationships with family members and friends as well. All of this is going to be sacrificed at the altar of drug use. For this reason, everyone needs to keep an eye out for a drop in motivation or changes in someone’s memory. These are hallmark signs of drug abuse.

5. The Development of Withdrawal

When someone goes for any length of time without having drugs in the body, withdrawal symptoms are going to set in. This is going to come as a result of detox symptoms. The symptoms are going to vary from drug to drug; however, there are a few common themes. For example, sweats, shakes, and irritability and going to be common. Someone is going to have trouble sleeping as he or she goes through withdrawal. These symptoms can be unbearable and some might even lead to seizures. Those who are going through withdrawal are often going t to be begging for drugs. This is where the help of trained professionals is going to be needed.

Rely on the Professionals from Soba Recovery for Addiction Treatment

Anyone who has a loved one dealing with drug abuse knows that this is a serious problem that requires help from trained professionals. That is where Soba Recovery can be of assistance. We are a professional drug and alcohol treatment program with locations in Texas and Arizona. Combining proven methods with an innovative twist, Soba Recovery offers detox and inpatient assistance for those in need. To learn more call us today.